Patient Education

Family Medicine Clinic would like to be your partner in health care. Feel free to ask your questions and share your concerns with us. We will work with you to develop a wellness program for the care and treatment you need.

We welcome you to our practice and look forward to caring for you.

Family Medicine Clinic provides a full range of medical services including the following:


Family Medicine

Family medicine, also known as family practice, is the medical specialty in which physicians provide comprehensive, patient-centered primary health care to patients and their families. Physicians who practice family medicine can provide routine wellness care, such as physical exams or preventative care, to patients, regardless of age, gender, health or social status. They are also trained to know about many areas of medicine so that they are equipped to treat a wide variety of conditions. ...


Read More...

Smoking Cessation

Smoking cessation, also known as quitting smoking, is the process of stopping smoking and the use of tobacco products. Around 6 million deaths worldwide, per year, can be attributed to tobacco use. Of that amount, about 443,000 Americans die each year due to smoking and secondhand smoke related illnesses. Smoking cigarettes is responsible for more American deaths than car accidents, alcohol, and other causes of death combined. Smoking related illnesses account for 20 percent of all deaths in the United States. ...


Read More...

Sexually Transmitted Diseases

A sexually transmitted disease, or STD, is a disease or infection that is spread from one person to another through sexual contact. Most STDs are caused by bacteria, parasites or viruses, that are transmitted through contact with the genitals, skin, mouth, rectum, or bodily fluids. There are many different types of viruses that are characterized as STDs, some of which include: ...


Read More...

Osteoarthritis

Arthritis is a condition that causes pain, stiffness and swelling in the joints. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. It develops as the cartilage protecting the bones of a joint wears down over time. Over the years, as stress is put on the joints, cartilage wears thin and sometimes even erodes completely, resulting in stiffness and pain. It occurs more frequently in older individuals, however it sometimes develops in athletes from overuse of a joint or after an injury. It commonly affects the fingers, knees, lower back and hips and is often treated with medication and certain forms of exercise and physical therapy. In severe cases, joint replacement surgery may be suggested. Osteoarthritis tends to get worse over time. ...


Read More...

Heart Attack

A heart attack occurs when the coronary arteries, the blood vessels that deliver blood to the heart, are suddenly blocked and cannot supply the heart with blood and oxygen. This blockage causes damage and gradual death of the heart muscle and often requires immediate treatment in order to save the person's life. Also known as a myocardial infarction, heart attacks most often occur as a result of coronary artery disease, a condition in which plaque builds up inside the arteries. Heart attacks are the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. ...


Read More...

Strep Throat

Strep throat is a highly contagious bacterial infection of the throat caused by the group A Streptococcus bacteria. Children between the ages of 5 and 15 are commonly affected, but strep throat can affect people of all ages. If left untreated, strep throat can cause kidney inflammation or rheumatic fever. ...


Read More...

Dementia

Dementia is not a single disorder, but rather a combination of age-related symptoms involving a loss of mental skills and deteriorating brain function. Dementia literally translates to "deprived of mind," and may be the result of several different underlying conditions, some of which are treatable and some of which are not. Patients with dementia gradually lose memory, communication skills, the ability to reason, and the facility to complete the tasks of everyday living. ...


Read More...

Urinary Tract Infection

A urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common infection of the urinary system, which includes the kidneys, ureters, bladder and urethra. The urinary tract refers to just the bladder and the urethra, and an infection can develop in either of these areas. These infections occur much more frequently in women than in men and may cause intense pain and discomfort. ...


Read More...

Cardiovascular Disease

Heart disease, also known as cardiovascular disease, is the leading cause of death among both men and women in the United States. Heart disease encompasses some of the following conditions:

  • Coronary artery disease
  • Arrhythmia
  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Cardiomyopathy
  • Heart infections
  • Congenital heart defect
  • Peripheral artery disease
  • Stroke
  • Angina
  • Valve damage

Despite its high death rate, heart disease usually occurs when certain risk factors, controllable by the patient, are present. While a family history of heart disease and increasing age cannot be controlled, there are several lifestyle changes patients can make to help reduce their risk of heart disease and improve their health as well. ...


Read More...

Obesity

Obesity is a chronic condition defined by an excess of body fat. Body fat has several important functions in the body, such as storing energy and providing insulation. Excess body fat, however, may interfere with an individual's health and well-being, particularly if a patient becomes morbidly obese. Not only does obesity interfere with everyday activities, it also increases the risk of developing serious medical conditions, such as high blood pressure and diabetes. Obesity is a serious health issue presently reaching epidemic proportions in society. It results in medical complications and early morbidity for a great many people. Other health conditions caused or exacerbated by obesity may include heart disease, osteoarthritis, sleep apnea, high cholesterol and asthma. The good news is that obesity is a treatable ailment and that modern medicine provides more remedies for the condition than previously existed. ...


Read More...

Electrocardiogram

An electrocardiogram is a diagnostic test that measures the electrical activity of the heart. Also known as an EKG or ECG, the electrocardiogram translates the information it receives into a pattern of waves for analysis. An EKG produces a record of waves that correspond to the electrical impulses that occur during each beat of a patient's heart. This non-invasive test is usually performed as part of a routine physical examination, however, it may be performed to investigate the cause of heart-related symptoms such as chest pain, shortness of breath and heart palpitations. ...


Read More...

Asthma

Asthma is a condition in which the lungs and air passages become inflamed and constricted, interfering with normal breathing. During the first stage of an asthmatic response, inhaled allergens or other irritants cause the airways to constrict. During the second stage, there is an inflammatory response, causing the airways to swell and fill with thickened, sticky mucus. Patients with asthma have increasing difficulty breathing during an attack, making the wheezing sound associated with the condition. Asthma affects approximately 15 million Americans each year. Although life-threatening, it can most often be well-controlled with medication. ...


Read More...

Urinary Incontinence

Urinary incontinence, also known as UI, is a common condition that involves the involuntary loss of urine. Although it is not usually a serious condition, UI can be embarrassing and affect a person's daily life. Urinary incontinence is most common in women, especially during and after pregnancy, but can affect people of all ages. ...


Read More...

Routine Physical Exam

A routine physical exam is recommended at least once each year for patients of all ages. This complete medical examination allows the doctor to evaluate the patients health and discover problems before they start. Early detection of a disease could result in easier and more effective treatment. ...


Read More...

Colonoscopy

A colonoscopy is a diagnostic procedure performed to examine the inside of the colon and rectum. The colonoscopy procedure can aid in determining the cause of changes in bowel activity, abdominal pain, rectal bleeding, as well as detect early signs of cancer. A colonoscopy may be recommended as an option for people who are at risk of developing cancer of the colon and rectum, known as colorectal cancer, or CRC. ...


Read More...

Diabetes

Diabetes is the inability of the body to create or use insulin. It is a serious, chronic metabolic disorder in which the body either does not produce enough insulin or does not respond to the insulin being produced. Diabetes affects an estimated 26 million children and adults in the United States; over eight percent of the population. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, more than breast cancer and AIDS combined. While diabetes can lead to serious complications, it can often be successfully managed through dedicated, lifelong treatment. ...


Read More...

Ear Infections

Ear infections, also known as otitis media, are one of the most common childhood medical problems. Ear infections are the most frequent cause of doctor visits for children. In fact, three out of four children in the United States will have at least one ear infection by the time they reach the age of three. ...


Read More...

Flu Shot

Influenza, also known as the flu, is a contagious virus that appears seasonally. The flu can start as early as October and usually subsides by May. The flu affects between 5 to 20 percent of the people in the United States each year and can lead to serious complications. There are more than 200,000 people hospitalized as a result of the flu, with an estimated 49,000 deaths attributed to the flu each year. ...


Read More...

Shingles

Shingles is a disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus, the herpes virus responsible for chickenpox. Once an individual has been infected with chickenpox, this virus lies dormant within the body's nerve tissue. Years later, the virus may reactivate as shingles, often after another illness or during a period of great stress. Advancing age and immune deficiency disorders are also risk factors for shingles. ...


Read More...

High Cholesterol

Cholesterol is produced by the liver, the intestines and nearly all tissues in the body. Cholesterol is needed for the production of hormones, vitamin D and the bile necessary to digest the fats in food. Cholesterol also protects cell membranes from changes in temperature. While a certain amount of cholesterol is needed, too much cholesterol is unhealthy. An excessive amount of cholesterol can block blood flow in the arteries. This lack of blood flow can lead to a stroke. While there are no symptoms of high cholesterol, a simple blood test can provide patients with results. Cholesterol levels can be controlled or reduced with an active and healthy lifestyle. In some cases, medication may be necessary to control high levels of cholesterol. ...


Read More...

Stroke

A stroke occurs when there is a reduction in the flow of blood to the brain. The lack of blood supply may be the result of a blockage in an artery or a burst blood vessel in the brain. A stroke deprives brain tissue of oxygen and nutrients, causing brain cells to die. A stroke is a medical emergency and requires immediate attention by a medical professional. Prompt treatment can minimize damage to the brain and prevent further complications. ...


Read More...

Sleep Disorders

Sleep disorders are disturbances in sleep patterns. They involve difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, excessive daytime tiredness, irregular breathing during sleep, or abnormal sleep behaviors. Sleep disorders may develop as a result of changes in the neurotransmitters of the brain, taking certain medications (such as corticosteroids), illness, stress, anxiety, depression, excessive caffeine or alcohol, or drug use. A sleep disorder can interfere with daily activities, and affect overall health and quality of life. When accurately diagnosed, however, most sleep disorders can be effectively treated. ...


Read More...

Diet and Exercise

Developing a healthy diet and regular exercise regimen are equally important. Many people only consider improving their diet and exercise routine when they want to lose weight. Diet and exercise, however, should not be forgotten once weight loss goals are achieved since they are important health factors even in individuals who are at an optimal weight. ...


Read More...

High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, occurs when the pressure of the blood flowing against the artery walls is above the normal range. Blood pressure is determined by the amount of blood the heart pumps and the blood flow resistance in the arteries. If the heart pumps more blood than normal, and the the arteries are narrower than normal, the result is high blood pressure. Untreated high blood pressure can cause serious health problems, including heart attack, kidney failure and stroke. There are two types of high blood pressure: primary and secondary. Primary hypertension is high blood pressure that develops gradually over the course of time, and secondary hypertension is high blood pressure that results from an underlying medical condition. ...


Read More...

Coronary Artery Disease

Coronary artery disease is a buildup of fatty deposits in the coronary arteries, which supply blood to the heart. This buildup of fat, cholesterol and calcium, known collectively as plaque, can cause a hardening and narrowing of the arteries which restricts blood from reaching the heart. Blood clots can also form and completely block the artery. Coronary artery disease develops gradually and can eventually lead to a heart attack or heart failure. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for both men and women. ...


Read More...

Arthritis

Arthritis is a condition that causes pain, stiffness and swelling in the joints. Osteoarthritis is a common form of arthritis caused by the wearing down of the cartilage that protects the bones of a joint. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune condition caused by an inflammation in the lining of the joints. Both forms of arthritis, cause pain, tenderness, and swelling, and may result in loss of movement in the affected joints. Over time, joints affected by arthritis may become severely damaged. Arthritis occurs more frequently in older individuals, however it sometimes develops in athletes from overuse of a joint or after an injury. It can however, affect people of any age, including children. ...


Read More...


Back to top